Meet Jon Beckley

Photographer Jon Beckley took photos for:

All Together Now #7 on 9/30/2017
All Together Now #5 on 5/27/2017

Artist Q&A:

Q: What do you try to achieve with your photographs?

A: I try to capture the emotion and feel of a performance which can be really hard as it needs to be single moment that not only shows the feeling of the performance, but ideally it’s also a good photograph which could stand on its’ own just for anyone looking at it.

Q: What’s the hardest part of shooting a live event?

A: Getting to know the performers and having everything click for that perfect moment. I try to line up my compositions and then watch them for a little bit, even in the space of a song you can get an idea of what they’ll do during the chorus or another major moment. But this also can change a lot during the course of a set and things can come back quickly so knowing when to shoot becomes almost a reflex.

Q: What’s your earliest memory with a camera?

A: It’s not actually with a physical camera, I started on this path via 3D modeling and animation when I was 12 and through those programs I had to control the camera position, settings, and lighting for the scene so it actually gave me a lot of skills that I’d later use in my photography. It wasn’t until I was 19 that I got my first camera and started experimenting with it.

Q: What drew you to photography?

A: Initially it was to create texture maps for my 3D work, but I quickly found that I could capture a scene almost instantly with the camera VS spending large amounts of time building it from scratch. Soon after I brought it to a Dresden Dolls show and I was hooked, concert photography is what really propelled me early on. I also had the benefit of being in art school at the time so I was able to dive in head first into it and had the help of some great professors.

 

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Meet Felice Ling

 

Felice Ling

Just Felice performs for All Together Now #5, May 27, 2017 at the Lily Pad.

If she looks familiar, you might have seen her working on the streets of Harvard Square. Occasionally funny, often awkward, and always astonishing, she has performed in Memphis, Chicago, and Cambridge. Before she was a street performer, though, she was a magician performing in her family living room nearly every Thanksgiving for fifteen years. She’s not flashy, she’s not snazzy – she’s Just Felice.
http://www.justfelice.com/

Artist Quote

 “Magic gets people to question everything that they know about the world – at least for one moment, however fleeting it is. That’s what magic does: it creates moments of astonishment.”

Meet Jenee Halstead and Mark Lipman

Jenee Halstead and Mark Lipman

Mark Lipman and Jenee Halstead have been sharing the stage for years as singing partners on each other’s original music. The idea of collaborating on a project together had been floating around for a couple of years, and they’re bringing it to life in a set that will combine story-telling, song, and elements of expressive movment. Together they are exploring the worlds of activism, desire, queer identity, the wounded healer and what it means to be an artists and a human in a world that want to commodify and control the human experience.

Chances are, if you’ve ever seen Mark Lipman play, your emotions have been stirred from the moment he opens his mouth to sing. His music is a combination of soulful, evocative, soaring, gritty vocals set to songs that are at once highly personal and familiar. If you detect something expansive and mysterious in the music of Jenee Halstead, a freedom that owes no debt to place and time — or even genre — you understand where she’s coming from. And where she’s headed … deeper into the essence of song.
https://www.marklipmanmusic.com/
https://www.jeneehalstead.com/

Meet Zayde Buti

Zayde Buti Crop

Zayde Buti is a performance artist and musician who writes, produces and performs weird art music (http://www.zaydebuti.com/music.html). He also produces and performs in even weirder music videos (http://www.zaydebuti.com/videos.html). Zayde has performed live in venues across New England and has made street performances throughout the Boston area. http://www.zaydebuti.com/

Artist Quote

“Performance art can drive people crazy.”

Meet Poor Eliza

Poor Eliza
Poor Eliza (Jane Park) is a Boston songwriter who loves to explore themes from her Tennessee upbringing with the sounds and rhythms of alt-country and indie-rock. She has played all over the Boston area, and is excited to try new things and meet more artists! Her latest self-released title “Ghost Town” is the tale of a townie who never leaves their hometown.